FTF Issue with G27

Discussion in 'Glock Forum' started by Blackmagic02, Feb 21, 2012.

  1. Blackmagic02

    Blackmagic02 New Member

    A couple of weeks ago I took my G27 to the range. It has probably had around 1000 rounds through it. I stepped up to bat and much to my surprise it went "click" on the first round. Then I had several more failures but was eventually able to fire all 50 rounds. 180 gr Federal Champion. The failures were light strikes. Took it home, cleaned it, bought some different ammo (165 gr Win white box), and tried it again last week. "Click". Several failures again with both kinds of ammo. I showed it to the RSO and he took the slide and shot some CLP into the hole in the slide just behind the breech face. A couple of more failures initially but then shot 30 rounds with no failures. Took it home, cleaned it as normal, then shot some CLP in myself. It appears I had build-up in the firing pin channel. My question is whether or not I have done enough? I clean and oil all my semi-autos (Glock or not) the way Glock recommends in the manual and have not had any problems in the past. Should the firing pin and spring be removed for a more thorough cleaning of the channel (Glock doesn't mention or recommend) or shoot some CLP in the slide whenever cleaning?
     
  2. emtknox

    emtknox New Member

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    I do a full take down after every 500 shots to make sure my pin and spring are clean and functioning. If ur 27 is a carry weapon and ur life depends on it do it. Very simple very quick
     

  3. Happysniper1

    Happysniper1 New Member

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    I do a partial detail-strip after every range session, because I shoot a lot each session.

    I clean with ultrasonics, so all I really do is detail-strip the slide, drop everything into the cleaning tub, and watch TV while it goes. I realize this is an exotic (read "expensive") way to do it, but I never need to scrub with a brush. 20 mins in the ultra, then rinse with hot water under the tap, make sure water flows in and out of everything, blow dry with air compressor, lubricate and reassemble.

    Yah, crud can accumulate everywhere. More so if you are shooting "dirty" ammo, and if humudity tends to be high where you shoot and where you carry. Any halfway decent lube oil that is light enough to coat the parts thru molecular cohesion and viscuous enough not to attract lint and dust, will do well to help "float" microscopic crud off the metal parts....but that crud has to go someplace if it doesn't get cleaned out.

    Take care of her, and she will take care of you :D
     
  4. kodiak

    kodiak Active Member

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    detail strip the slide and pull the striker assy out. Clean out all the carbon, then dry it out. It's not supposed to be wet in the channel, or it will get crudded up even quicker.
     
  5. Happysniper1

    Happysniper1 New Member

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    And remember: unlike Sigs, Glocks need very little oil.
     
  6. kodiak

    kodiak Active Member

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    This is the location I'm talking about.
     

    Attached Files:

  7. Happysniper1

    Happysniper1 New Member

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    TECHNICAL CORRECTION:

    So as not to confuse any readers new to guns and malfunctions, the problem described in this thread is a MISFIRE.

    FTF is a Failure to Feed, meaning a fiream failed to chamber a round from the magazine.

    FTE is a Failure to Extract, meaning a firearm failed to remove the spent cartridge when it cycled.

    MISFIRE is when the round fails to go off when struck by the firing pin (or in the case of Glocks, the striker).

    FIRING PIN MALFUNCTION / STRIKER MALFUNCTION is when the trigger is pulled but the firing pin or striker fails to impact the primer.

    Just thought I'd toss that in....
     
  8. Happysniper1

    Happysniper1 New Member

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    (*PS* there are other malfunctions that I did not mention, but none germane to this thread. Have a nice day! :))
     
  9. SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13 RETIRED MODERATOR Sponsor Lifetime Supporting Member

    Good post Happysniper1...!
     
  10. Happysniper1

    Happysniper1 New Member

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    Thank you, Sir!
     
  11. knuck

    knuck New Member

    good stuff considering im still learning :D
     
  12. Blackmagic02

    Blackmagic02 New Member

    My mistake. If I could change it I would. That's why I don't often post. Have a tendency to stick my foot in it. In the interest of sticking my other foot in it. How do I remove the slide cover plate? Should I consider an ultrasonic cleaning this time since I have had failures? I haven't carried this gun since this issue came up. I have no desire to tell my Maker: "Damn, it went click".
     
  13. kodiak

    kodiak Active Member

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    Pictures are worth a thousand words. Best thing to do is do a search on YouTube for Glock detailed disassembly or something along those lines. It's really simple so don't get discouraged.
     
  14. Happysniper1

    Happysniper1 New Member

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    @BlackMagic02: no need to fear posting. And everyone makes mistakes. And the Members on this Board are (by and large) mellow, so don't think anyone is trying to flame you on a correction.

    It is good that you are just learning, now is the time to learn correctly....it leaves no bad habits to un-learn, if you know what I mean.

    Now, back to your post...when I clean with ultrasonics (which is everytime I clean a gun), it needs to be detail-stripped. Reason is, the action of the ultrasonics is millions of microscopic air bubbles form and burst along the surface of the metals, and it is this cavitation bursting effect that basically "scrubs" the surfaces clean....the crud comes out, oh boy does it come out!, but it needs a place to go, otherwise when it dries out, it gums up the works, perhaps even worse than before the cleaning.

    To detail-strip a Glock slide assembly, all you need is the Glock tool or a 3/32" punch. If you haven't watched the many videos on the subject, we can gladly detail how it's done. It is ridiculously easy!

    What factors work against you to create a dirty gun?

    Humid air that contains a lot of suspended particulates; the humidity actually helps airborne dust and lint to stick to your gun.

    Too much oiling will also do the same thing.

    Firing "dirty" ammunition (ammo in varnished steel cases - where does the vaporized varnish recondense when the chamber cools? Yep, in your gun) and also ammo that uses dirty gunpowders (have someone shoot a round or two out of your gun, and watch the muzzle....do you see smoke from "smokeless" gunpowder? Also, look at the spent casings...do them seem excessively black and sooty?...guess what- that [email protected] is in your gun, too.)

    Now, Glocks are known for reliability even when dirty. The problem is, anything dirty will eventually fail. Do you need to detail strip and clean after every range session? I do not think so, depends on how many rounds you have fired thru it in that session. Do you need to detail strip when using ultrasonics? Yes, there is no choice. Can you detail-strip too much? Yes, if in the extereme. The pins holding everything in on the frame are steel, and they go into plastic holes. Eventually, the holes will wear, and the pins will become loose. I do not know how long (or short) it takes for this to happen. I shoot every week, sometimes twice a week. I never shoot less than 200 rounds when I do. And I detail strip and clean with ultrasonics whenever I do clean my gun. Have not had any problems so far, and I've been doing it this way for about 4 years now, with very few exceptions.

    By the way, when you clean with a decent ultrasonic cleaner, you no longer need to scrub any crud out with a brush. No wear-and-tear from plastic of phosphor-bronze brushes! :D
     
  15. voyager4520

    voyager4520 New Member

    You need to detail strip and clean the slide. In the future, do no get excess oil into the internals of the slide, excess oil in those areas will collect more residue and brass flakes and will cause malfunctions again. If you put oil in the internals of the slide during detail strip, you need to wipe them as dry as possible before reassembly.

    I personally use Hoppe's Elite Gun Cleaner and q-tips, then wipe dry with clean dry q-tips. Then for corrosion protection I use Ballistol and q-tips, then wipe as dry as possible with clean dry q-tips. Rubbing alcohol will work just as well for cleaning.
    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7VTIqAMPOco[/ame]
    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oV0wDDFV0NY[/ame]

    Here's an easy way to disassemble and reassemble the firing pin assembly:
    [​IMG]

    When you install the firing pin safety spring back into the firing pin safety, you need to push the spring into the firing pin safety until you feel the spring 'click' into place. If you don't fully insert the spring into the safety, the spring may come out of the safety and turn sideways in the slide, rendering the gun inoperable or causing dangerous malfunctions. When you reassemble the firing pin assembly, the end of the spring with more "bunched up coils" goes toward the firing pin spring cups.

    On the following page are some Glock Armorer's Manuals, just scroll down to the "G" section. I learned from the Update Manual and 2009 Manual. The 2009 Manual has a few pages missing, but that info can be found in the Update Manual as well.
    http://stevespages.com/page7b.htm
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2012
  16. Dutch1911

    Dutch1911 New Member

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    Since you're over a thousand rounds... Spend ten bucks and replace the striker spring and your recoil spring. If need assistance please ket me know ill walj you through it.

    Dutch1911
    1/*
    Black Talon Defensive Dynamics LLC.
     
  17. There is absolutely no reason for this at 1k. I have over 50k on the originals.
     
  18. Blackmagic02

    Blackmagic02 New Member

    Thanks for all the great advice. Special thanks to Voyager4520. The videos were a big help. I couldn't believe all the crud I got out of the channel and extractor area. Grease, brass, an old shoe, soiled diaper, and part of a newspaper from 1980 something. Seriously though, it was pretty bad. I plan on doing the same with my G23. It can't be much better and is my primary carry gun. Thanks to all. My peace of mind is restored.