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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recently a friend of mine, Viet Nam Combat pilot friend passed away and I inherited about 250 reloaded 9mm ammo. I poured them into a bag with some factory loads and started shooting. All of a sudden the gun sort of jumped in my hand and smoked poured out the side rails. Being ignorant I loaded up another mag of mixed armor and after a couple of rounds the gun really jumped, kinda blew up. The gun jammed and I can't even rack the slide to eject the casing. I'm wondering what type of 9mm gun did he have that would have been able to handle overpressure loads like that? Any theory, suggestions or comments would be greatly appreciated. Incidentally I called Glock and they said if I mail it back to them they'll either fix it or sell me a reconditioned or a new one at $300 or $350 respectively.
 

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Just my 2 cents...

I suppose you did not inherit any notes on these particular reloads? How many rounds did you think you shot of the reloaded ammo?

I reload most of what I shoot and my first thought was maybe he changed powders and didn't adjust for the difference, or loaded a few double charges without realizing it. Accidents do happen.

Next, the brass could've been worn thin through successive reloading and just ruptured.

Also, he may have been trying for a high pressure load like 9mm NATO and miscalculated, etc.

Likewise, he may have loaded some hot rounds for a revolver, like a sturdy Ruger .357/9mm blackhawk.

Lastly, the primer pocket may have not been tight, allowing gases backwards (unintended direction).

So... The problem with shooting reloads is that you have to believe the reloader knew what he was doing and didn't screw anything up accidentally.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you, you just hit it on the head. He had a Ruger 357 Nighthawk. I didn't know it would shoot 9mm. In addition it was a true pistol, no double action. Thanks that explains the reloads.
 

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I don’t shoot reloads. I will and have shot remanufactured ammo but that’s from companies I’ve come to trust. I’ve inherited some reloads down the line. Never shot any of them. They sit in case times get super desperate. Hopefully someone will inherit them from me.
 

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Unknown reloads have sent many good guns to a untimely end,if they are not your loads do not shoot them.
 

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Was he by any chance a competition shooter? My USPSA open gun is a custom 2011. The 9mm loads I run in it would destroy many factory guns. For it the extra pressure/gas is needed for the comp to function. I load these way beyond the SAMMI specs.

Beyond that, they are likely just poorly loaded rounds. I shoot almost exclusively reloads. However I will never shoot a reload from an unknown/trusted source.
 

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The only reloads anyone should use is their own, or risk a case rupture or KaBoom. The most common cause of KB is bullet setback. Even .060" of setback can spike up pressure. Tap the rest of the rounds and see if the bullet does go back at all. Check the OAL on the remaining ammo also. No one can call a double charge without knowing what press and powder were used. Auto progressive's cannot double because they can't run backwards. Manual indexer's, yes, like a Dillon 550. But that is why you use a high volume low density powder that occupies at least 60% of the case so if you do double it then it will spill over. So when I load 9mm on my 550 I use BE-86 at 4.4 grains as the case can only hold about 7 grains of that powder. However on my Dillon Square Deal, I run 4.0 grains of TiteGroup, and a case can easily hold 11 grains. Loose primers cause breech face erosion, not KB's. Even if it was a squib, and you pull the trigger, still won't KB the gun, but it will bulge this **** outta the barrel. The other cause could be, like Silver said, he was a USPSA/IPSC shooting loading 9 Major (125 gr going over 1,340 fps, even hotter than +P+). Putting that in a Glock will KB it. Pressure can go from 35Ksi to over 45Ksi.

However, blowing up a hand gun, especially a Glock, is no big deal, other than it hurts your wallet. Blowing up an AR, especially a AR10, is a whole different ball game.

This was a G17 blown up by running TiteGroup on a 550, instead of 3 grs it was 6 grains under a 147 gr bullet. He was watching the grand kids watching TV while loading......

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OP, unless the frame is damaged, I would not send the gun back if only the barrel is stuck. Put it over 2 blocks of wood, and tap the breech end straight down, it will take some force. Course if the barrel is split and the slide is cracked, oh well.
 

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OP, I've since many Glocks lock up from case ruptures (not KaBoom). It usually just blows the mag button and mag out, but no damage to the gun. If you look up thru the mag well and see this, it's a rupture. You should still be able to tap the barrel out.

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You got to remember when you get a case rupture, stop shooting right then. You have to check to be sure the bullet didn't lodge in the barrel. When a case ruptures, the bullet may not go all the way through the barrel (smoke coming out of the sides of the gun means the powder didn't burn in the barrel) and become stuck. This is a 'squib'. Trying to shoot another bullet on top of a bullet stuck in the barrel (aka squib') will most certainly cause a kaboom. It's possible none of the reloads were over charged or had bullet set back. It could be just corroded brass. It isn't uncommon for corroded brass to rupture even with normal loads.
 

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Actually firing a round over a squib will not KaBoom the gun. It will however bulge the heck out of the barrel. When our department first issued G22's in the way back, we had a bunch of KB's due to the new 40S&W loads, so the department switched to G17's. Then we had a bunch of squibs from Federal. I still have a couple of the bulged barrels left. The rest I sent back to Glock for new barrels.
 

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It's not advice, I've eye witnessed it many times at the academy. How about you? Ever witnessed one? Bullet setback is what most often blows up guns, sometimes a double charge, but you would have to know what power and charge weight, what OAL, what bullet construction and weight. Auto progressives can't double because they can't run backwards. Single's and turrets, and the Dillon 550, yes. That's why you always look in the case before seating a bullet, and on my 550 I've been running since 1986, always use a high volume low density slow powder that a normal charge will occupy 70% of the case volume.
 
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