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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Wondering how many practice drawing from concealment. We talk about how important it is to practice our draw at home, but do you practice drawing with your shirt covering like it would be in a real life encounter?
Personally I almost never draw from an exposed holster, even in live fire training.
 

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Yes, I do my dry fire and live fire with my carry gun and always from concealment. Depending on the season concealment for me ranges from a t-shirt to a heavy coat
 

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This is one of the reasons a local competition can help you out immensely.
IDPA, GSSF or whatever can help you learn real quick what holster and equipment works or doesn’t.
 

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IDPA!! Not only is it great fun, but it will tell you very quickly if your weapon platform is functional!

I was quite comfortable carrying a G43, until I ran the gun in IDPA. Great gun, but my thumb knuckle bulged at the slide lock causing the slide to lock open occasionally with rounds in the magazine!

Now carry a SW Shield or G26 after proving the weapon through without issue through many IDPA stages.
 

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Personally I almost never draw from an exposed holster, even in live fire training.
While I applaud those who routinely practice drawing from concealment, it's actually good to practice a variety of techniques.

Becoming 'unconsciously competent' with a single technique can be problematic if that specific technique isn't available when the SHTF.

For example...

Do you practice drawing 'wrong handed' (in case your primary hand is disabled)?

Do you practice single-handed reloading and malfunction clearing with your dominant and non-dominant hand?

Do you practice racking the slide one-handed only... with your dominant and non-dominant hand?

Have you ever attempted to rack a slide with one hand only when the plastic rear sight has 'popped off' and there's nothing for the slide to catch on?

These "Oh, crap!!!" examples go on and on... and are why focusing on becoming 'unconsciously competent' with a single technique is not such a good idea.

Just sayin'...

Best regards,

Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yes, The training classes has had us practice most go what you suggested, but have to say have not practiced them out of class.
 

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Yes, The training classes has had us practice most go what you suggested, but have to say have not practiced them out of class.
I understand. :)

The important thing is to sufficiently practice alternate techniques so you don't 'freeze' when your 'most preferred' technique is unavailable... that is, you automatically transition to your 'next most preferred' technique without having to think about it.

'Fast' may save your life... 'slow' may get you killed.

(By the way, "'Fast' may save your life... 'slow' may get you killed." also applies to 'situational awareness', 'target acquisition', 'time to first meaningful hit', 'time to sufficient meaningful hits that stop the threat, ad infinitum... ad nauseam.)

Best regards,

Bob
 

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Wondering how many practice drawing from concealment. We talk about how important it is to practice our draw at home, but do you practice drawing with your shirt covering like it would be in a real life encounter?
Personally I almost never draw from an exposed holster, even in live fire training.
I always carry a hot gun, so I practice drawing with a hot gun. I carry a G21 and G20 in year round shorts and tshirt. I know, all wrong, right? That's the beauty of firearms, do what works for you. I pocket carry a P365, that is incredibly accurate for a mouse gun. 9mm is for paper targets :)
 

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Wondering how many practice drawing from concealment. We talk about how important it is to practice our draw at home, but do you practice drawing with your shirt covering like it would be in a real life encounter?
Personally I almost never draw from an exposed holster, even in live fire training.
The indoor shooting range where I practice lets you draw from concealment, but you have to pass a qualification course first. NONE of the other ranges here in Wichita will let you do that.

It's a revelation to be able to draw from the same holster I'll draw from if something drastic ever happens. I carry IWB at 2:20 or 3:00 position. I wear either long pants in the winter or short pants in the summer. I also wear a oversized floppy t-shirt., and that's all I ever wear.

When I practice, I I do the dot torture drill with no timer (it's an untimed drill), a few failure drills with a shot timer (I suck but I'm getting better slowly), and a strong-hand-only and weak-hand-only drill.
Now that I hooked up with a range that lets me draw from concealment, I can't imagine any other way to practice. The kicker is that my draw is getting better and better!
 

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15-30 minutes dry fire practice every other day. Since I shoot IDPA, drawing from concealment is a regular part of dry fire. Both my EDC (G43x) and my competition gun ( G19 with RDS). Today’s drill was drawing while seated in the car.
 

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I practice a few draws a couple times a week, but since I do it at home, I do it with snap caps only, as part of regular dry fire practice.
 
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