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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So after going to the range a few times and renting guns over the last couple of months, I ended up buying a Glock 45 and just got it today. Prior to this, I passed my local CCW course, watched every video I could imagine and got an hour's private tutelage from a former Navy Seal instructor with respect to gun safety, gun control, grip, shooting and other basics. Oh, and a gun shooter friend got me started on this when he passed by earlier this summer and started me off at the range, complete with his tips on handling the gun. I am in my 60s, not athletic, and with sufficiently bad back problems that I'm not interested in tactical training or even having an EDC though I'll apply for the permit now.

I mostly want to use my handgun for home defense and shooting at the indoor range and perhaps outdoor when it's not so hot.

Given these things, my instructor suggested I concentrate on the basics. Learn to shoot steadily and develop a smooth trigger pull while practicing shooting at the range in a systematic way. Also, I need to raise my grip strength and do lots of dry firing at home just to get used to my gun and improve my ability to obtain sight on target. My astigmatism (even with corrective progressive lenses) often leads me to get one good shot then my eye wanders and loses the focus on the front sight and things often become a blur until I wait for quite a bit and refocus. I will also get an add on Big dot sight as that seems the most effective sight for me as I don't want to go whole hog on Red Dots yet. Other than that, upgrades are not relevant next to shooting and practice.

Does this seem like a sensible short term course of action? I have bought sufficient ammo, cleaned and oiled my new gun, and plan to hit the range 3-4x per month at the least despite my current work schedule.

Any other suggestions?
 

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Sounds like you're developing a good foundation. I think focusing on the basics is probably the best thing to do at this point, especially sight alignment and trigger control. Dry firing and presentation (getting gun in your hands and on target) will be great things to do, especially when you are away from the range.
You already have so much to get used to doing, so I wouldn't get too worried about extras, but you already are aware of things you'd like to change (like sights).
Don't forget to think about firearm storage and safety around the house, and run through some scenarios of how you would access the gun in an emergency.
 

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Glockin’ since 1993
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Welcome to the forum from North Texas!
Sounds like your all set. I dry fire almost daily. Pick a spot or 2 on the wall and focus on my sight picture, grip and trigger squeeze. Builds muscle memory and good reinforcement of basics. The more you do it the less you’ll have to think about it when you’re at the range live firing.
One thing I used to stress to new shooters. Grasp the pistol in a high proper grip every time, even when picking it up for examination or moving it.
Glocks are more susceptible to malfunctions induced by improper grip than most any other handgun.
Learn the trigger. Take up the slack and focus on the break. You only need to let it back out enough to get the audible and tactile “click” for reset for subsequent shots.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks a lot for your comments. One issue I had is that I could not, for the life of me keep focus on the front sight. One shot would be dead center and then my focus would blur. The rear sights would distort my view of the front and often all would blur together, often the more I concentrated on staying focused. Do you think this would be fixed with the Big Dot sight? I'm hoping that would draw my eye naturally to the main feature.
 

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If you still have the OEM Glock sites, black out the rear white bucket with a permanent black marker. That helped me ignore the rear sight and focus on the front sight.

I now run Night Fision yellow front black rear night sights.
 

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Glockin’ since 1993
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Thanks a lot for your comments. One issue I had is that I could not, for the life of me keep focus on the front sight. One shot would be dead center and then my focus would blur. The rear sights would distort my view of the front and often all would blur together, often the more I concentrated on staying focused. Do you think this would be fixed with the Big Dot sight? I'm hoping that would draw my eye naturally to the main feature.
I’ve experienced focus issues but usually concentrating on it takes care of it. Sometimes there’s a disconnect between the eyes and the brain but I’m sure that would’ve effected you in life in general so you would know if that was the problem. I’m at a loss for a solution.😔
 

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Fox Pepper Spray and....................
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pick up a G-sight laser kit for your pistol it will help you tremendously. You will see how your trigger pull is affecting your aim point and help you correct it faster IMO.
 

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If you still have the OEM Glock sites, black out the rear white bucket with a permanent black marker. That helped me ignore the rear sight and focus on the front sight.

I now run Night Fision yellow front black rear night sights.
"I now run Night Fision yellow front black rear night sights."

Agreed,for my astigmatism Night Fision are what the doctor ordered so to speak and I have thru the years had all the other manufactures night sights on the front of my guns.
Recently picked up a Hellcat and contacted Night Fision about a front sight for it,I was told they do not yet have a sight for it Yet but give them time.
 

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cournot, there is no substitute for the fundamentals: stance, grip, sight picture and trigger control, followed by transitions and movement. That is not a skill that is self taught as newbies don't even realize fundamentals. Shooting a pistol is 99% the shooter, and 1% gun and gear. There are no magic triggers, or sights, or ammo. And it's not breath and squeeze, that's for Bullseye, it's grip it and rip it. Go to USPSA.com or IDPA.org, and find a club nearest to you. All clubs have Masters/Grand Masters that teach for a very reasonable fee. This is not tactical training, it's just speed and accuracy.

Unfortunately astigmatism cannot be cured, nor managed, but there is a work around that actually works! First time I encountered a student with that condition, he was all over the map at 5 yards. Fundamentals were good, not cross eye dominate, so I am like? What the hell is this? So I had aim right at my nose with an empty airsoft G17 and watched is eye movement. He said I see a blurred double after a second. So, I told him to blink. Blink, fire, blink, fire, and that worked. He was beside himself. All touching at 5 yards. He understood what I meant by grip it and rip it, flash sight picture. Generally if your groups are big, you are shooting too slow!

All those years went by, with different instructors, and no one pointed that out that trick. Big dot sights nor red dots can fix astigmatism.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
cournot, there is no substitute for the fundamentals: stance, grip, sight picture and trigger control, followed by transitions and movement. That is not a skill that is self taught as newbies don't even realize fundamentals. Shooting a pistol is 99% the shooter, and 1% gun and gear. There are no magic triggers, or sights, or ammo. And it's not breath and squeeze, that's for Bullseye, it's grip it and rip it. Go to USPSA.com or IDPA.org, and find a club nearest to you. All clubs have Masters/Grand Masters that teach for a very reasonable fee. This is not tactical training, it's just speed and accuracy.

Unfortunately astigmatism cannot be cured, nor managed, but there is a work around that actually works! First time I encountered a student with that condition, he was all over the map at 5 yards. Fundamentals were good, not cross eye dominate, so I am like? What the hell is this? So I had aim right at my nose with an empty airsoft G17 and watched is eye movement. He said I see a blurred double after a second. So, I told him to blink. Blink, fire, blink, fire, and that worked. He was beside himself. All touching at 5 yards. He understood what I meant by grip it and rip it, flash sight picture. Generally if your groups are big, you are shooting too slow!

All those years went by, with different instructors, and no one pointed that out that trick. Big dot sights nor red dots can fix astigmatism.
SixG17s. Thank you. I realize it is the fundamentals I need. But you must realize I need to practice basic things like racking the slide, keeping my hands in the right position, maintaining a proper stance, etc. And given my lack of use before I find even holding the gun steady is a bit of a chore (as well as getting cut and struggling with that tiny serrated slide lock release when stripping the gun). I plan to use instructors as needed but I do think there is a place for just dry firing and shooting off rounds at a close range target to deal with all the things that are at the bottom of the fundamentals pyramid first. For you guys it's second nature. For me, it takes effort, grip and arm strength, and deliberate practice.

My plan is to do nothing but the fundamentals augmented by select private coaches as I find that a more efficient use of my time than going to large group classes as I can pick the times I shoot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
pick up a G-sight laser kit for your pistol it will help you tremendously. You will see how your trigger pull is affecting your aim point and help you correct it faster IMO.
I think a laser sight is too advanced for me. I just want a simple sight so that I'm not squinting at the front sight all the time and I've ordered a replacement already. That's the only mod I plan to do for this year at least. The rest is just basics and getting familiar with shooting, stance, breathing, aiming, etc.

Most important of all I will learn how much I like this hobby and whether I would stick with it or just keep the gun as a backup home defense weapon with only refresher trips to the range.

It's easy for beginners to get caught up in something new and then abandon it all 3 to 6 months later, so I want to be systematic about this.
 

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My plan is to do nothing but the fundamentals augmented by select private coaches as I find that a more efficient use of my time than going to large group classes as I can pick the times I shoot.
I would agree that most new shooters do better with one on one instructors, and most will that at a bit higher cost. Really what they do is observe issues that you cannot see, even if on video. I can't tell you how many times I've had students say "I never knew that, and I've been training for 15 years" Yup, and add physical limitations on top of that.
 

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cournot, it's actually not strength of grip (I have struggled with psoriatic arthritis and osteoarthritis, taking Humira injections every 2 weeks for over 22 years), but it is position of your shooting hand. You want to grab your gun as high as possible in the web of you hand and hold it almost straight armed. Not squeezing it to death, just holding on enough to cycle. Here is a video I made decades ago showing that, in the first, only 2 fingers gripping, the last, upside down one handed. Not strength, hand position.


 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Not for shooting per se. But even loading the magazines and racking the slide seems harder than usual for me. And I got tired after firing 30 rounds carefully and deliberately.

I would add that the instructor said my basic grip and stance were ok.
 

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There is a technique for loading, hold the mag in your left hand, thumb pushing loaded round down, and insert a new round with your right hand. Takes some practice. If that is not for you, get a UpLULA mag loader, easy as pie. Loading from slide lock takes the least amount of effort versus over head cranking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
There is a technique for loading, hold the mag in your left hand, thumb pushing loaded round down, and insert a new round with your right hand. Takes some practice. If that is not for you, get a UpLULA mag loader, easy as pie. Loading from slide lock takes the least amount of effort versus over head cranking.
I'll get there. I'm inherently a careful, deliberate person.
 

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Fox Pepper Spray and....................
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I think a laser sight is too advanced for me. I just want a simple sight so that I'm not squinting at the front sight all the time and I've ordered a replacement already. That's the only mod I plan to do for this year at least. The rest is just basics and getting familiar with shooting, stance, breathing, aiming, etc.

Most important of all I will learn how much I like this hobby and whether I would stick with it or just keep the gun as a backup home defense weapon with only refresher trips to the range.

It's easy for beginners to get caught up in something new and then abandon it all 3 to 6 months later, so I want to be systematic about this.
no its not a laser sight for your pistol. it is a training device that uses a laser that goes in the chamber of the gun, when you pull the trigger the firing pin hits the dummy round with laser in it

Home - G-Sight

here is a you tube video on the system, there are a lot more just first one that came up
 
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