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· Glockin’ since 1993
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Back in the 90’s we made it policy that modifications to duty gun had to be approved by the range master or Chief.
Some mods were no-gos without even asking.
I’ve seen non Glock guns break plastic rods but never a Glock. I’ve seen a few aftermarket metal rods not work properly in Glocks.
Internals were kept stock.
That being said the aftermarket has improved quite a bit since the 90’s and 00’s. I still see people having problems with aftermarket RSA parts.
Like RIP said, it’s your gun, do what you want.
If you really want to alter the trigger I’d probably contact Johnny Glock and get one of his duty triggers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Back in the 90’s we made it policy that modifications to duty gun had to be approved by the range master or Chief.
Some mods were no-gos without even asking.
I’ve seen non Glock guns break plastic rods but never a Glock. I’ve seen a few aftermarket metal rods not work properly in Glocks.
Internals were kept stock.
That being said the aftermarket has improved quite a bit since the 90’s and 00’s. I still see people having problems with aftermarket RSA parts.
Like RIP said, it’s your gun, do what you want.
If you really want to alter the trigger I’d probably contact Johnny Glock and get one of his duty triggers.
Thanks!
 
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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
I don’t know any le or military that modify internals on edc. I never would. I’ve been shooting for a minute or two. With that said, I’m a huge proponent of individual liberty. It’s your gun do what makes you happy.
I'm sure they don't. Probably because they don't want to give the plaintiff's attorney any ammunition. (no pun intended)
 
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Glock recommends replacing they RSA at 5000 rounds. I have gone as long as 25k on the factory RSA with no failures. Others on here have gone even longer. You are on a forum that has people with decades of LEO, Military, and Competition experience asking for advice. We are giving advice based on our years of experience. You are deciding to ignore the experience offered. My advice isn't offered to help keep you from prosecution. My advice is offered to prevent collateral damage. A lighter recoil spring will NOT reduce recoil. With factory ammo it will likely increase the muzzle rise and in some cases cause damage to the frame. Where a light recoil spring shines is with hand loads. Lighter loads for competition. The lighter loads may not fully cycle with the factory RSA so a lighter spring is necessary for the gun to cycle correctly. If I run factory ammo through my G34's that have a 13lb spring it will hammer the crap out of the lock block and frame. The only reason I run an after market guide rod is so I can run the lighter spring to go with my lighter hand loads. Once again, the muzzle control and recoil is controlled by your grip. You could hang a 5lb dumbbell off of the muzzle and it won't help with recoil.

Open your mind and ears. You are focused on what you want verses what the facts are. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Glock recommends replacing they RSA at 5000 rounds. I have gone as long as 25k on the factory RSA with no failures. Others on here have gone even longer. You are on a forum that has people with decades of LEO, Military, and Competition experience asking for advice. We are giving advice based on our years of experience. You are deciding to ignore the experience offered. My advice isn't offered to help keep you from prosecution. My advice is offered to prevent collateral damage. A lighter recoil spring will NOT reduce recoil. With factory ammo it will likely increase the muzzle rise and in some cases cause damage to the frame. Where a light recoil spring shines is with hand loads. Lighter loads for competition. The lighter loads may not fully cycle with the factory RSA so a lighter spring is necessary for the gun to cycle correctly. If I run factory ammo through my G34's that have a 13lb spring it will hammer the crap out of the lock block and frame. The only reason I run an after market guide rod is so I can run the lighter spring to go with my lighter hand loads. Once again, the muzzle control and recoil is controlled by your grip. You could hang a 5lb dumbbell off of the muzzle and it won't help with recoil.

Open your mind and ears. You are focused on what you want verses what the facts are. Good luck.
Okay Silver-Bolt,

So....I'm guessing you have no opinion about the best aftermarket trigger? If you will recall, that was the focus of my original post. You were the first to respond. Completely ignoring the focus of my post, you imparted unsolicited advice. You ended up hijacking my post. It turned into a debate about modifying stock triggers, etc. By the way, I'd like to thank the two or three people who actually answered my request.

You've been making assumptions about me that are: A. Wrong B. ignorant

I DO listen to people who are more experienced and knowledgeable than me. They don't agree with you. For example, when checking to see if it's advisable to modify my trigger, I looked to see what criminal defense lawyers who specialize in defending gun owner self-defense cases have to say about that. The consensus I found, is that they say it's fine. a trigger no lighter than four pounds for my Glock is acceptable.

I have literally watched slow motion videos that SHOW lighter recoil springs reduce muzzle flip. I've heard a number of people say Tungsten guide rods help manage recoil. Also, call this my own personal bias. When I started carrying in 1990, my firearm had a stainless steel guide rod. So, I JUST DON'T LIKE PLASTIC GUIDE RODS. They can break. Granted, they don't break often, but it happens.

I do heed the counsel of those who are more knowledgeable or experienced than me. It so happens that in this case, those whose advice I will heed, don't agree with you.

judging by your last post, I'd say I'm not the one who is narrow minded. It seems the only opinions you accept are of those who agree with you.
 

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FWIW, mind ya I've avoided this thread so far.

Johnny Glock for an aftermarket trigger would be my recommendation.
He even modifies the newest Timney triggers I believe.

Heavy guide rods I think are a bit bogus.
Too light a guide rod spring is not so good unless reloads, comps, or suppressor are @ play.

Some have said grip is important for regaining target acquisition, I agree.
Muzzle flip and recoil for a 9mm should be proper grip managed. I've tried running a comp on a 9mm G17 with various spring weights and no real fealt difference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
FWIW, mind ya I've avoided this thread so far.

Johnny Glock for an aftermarket trigger would be my recommendation.
He even modifies the newest Timney triggers I believe.

Heavy guide rods I think are a bit bogus.
Too light a guide rod spring is not so good unless reloads, comps, or suppressor are @ play.

Some have said grip is important for regaining target acquisition, I agree.
Muzzle flip and recoil for a 9mm should be proper grip managed. I've tried running a comp on a 9mm G17 with various spring weights and no real felt difference.
Thank you, Olga. Johnny Glock was recommended to me before. I'll look into them. I'm not sure you're supposed to feel the difference, but from a physics standpoint, lighter springs do reduce muzzle flip, as I saw on slow motion video. That, in turn, enables you to get back on target quicker, which was my intent all along, when I looked at modifying the trigger and slide spring/guide rod. In an extreme stress situation, I personally would feel better if the internals of my firearm helped me reacquire my target sooner, if I have to fire multiple times. The last thing I want is for bullets from my firearm to go astray. As far as the felt recoil, proper grip on the gun is necessary to help control that. Proper training takes care of that, as well as muzzle and trigger discipline. I know it has been brought up that a lighter trigger can cause ND under extreme stress. I read an article about the "NYPD trigger", which stated that they found their officers experienced frequent ND's with the 5.5 pound trigger. To solve this problem, they had the Glocks modified, giving them a 12 pound trigger. This effectively made the firearms the officers use, DAO's. I thought this was incredibly stupid. In my opinion, frequent ND's were a training issue, not a light trigger issue. Well, I guess after the change was made, they found their officers couldn't hit the broad side of a barn. Sure enough, NYPD is about to return to the 5.5 pound trigger, because, surprise surprise, they found their cops fired more accurately with a lighter trigger. Hopefully, they will properly train their officers this time, because, as we all know, under stress, most of us will do what we trained to do.
 

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You may want to rethink a lighter trigger for a carry gun. Recoil management is 98% done with a proper grip. There is no benefit to changing the RSA if you are shooting factory ammo. A heavy guide rod (tungsten) is a waste of money. Your money is better spent on an instructor.
I was thinking the same thing. I still go to the range 3 to 4 times a month and I'm old. Never to old to learn.
 

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Many years ago my friends invited me to shoot a Southwest Pistol League (SWPL) match with their friend, Taran Butler. I was slow and horrible. Taran Butler was not. I don't think his times would have changed that much even if he was shooting a Glock with a New York trigger.

To answer OP's question, I like the Timney Alpha. It's on sale at Midway for $99. Free shipping. Timney Alpha Competition Trigger Glock 17 19 22 23 34 35 Gen 3 4 Black

Here's what Johnny Glock thinks about the Timney Alpha for carry.
 

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I have to respectfully disagree with you, Silver Bolt. I've been shooting since 1990, and I've mastered the grip. The reason to lighten the trigger and reduce recoil and muzzle flip is to get back on target faster. Competitive shooters regularly use lighter triggers and recoil springs for the reasons I stated above. They fire thousands of rounds a month. Training will take care of the rest, like trigger and muzzle discipline, etc.
There’s truth to your statements.

I did things this way: my first ten years of shooting were devoted to countless hours of range time, a small fortune spent on defensive and tactical courses, and IDPA competitions. All with stock pistols. Then, just out of curiosity, I installed an Overwatch Precision tactical trigger kit (flat-faced aluminum shoe) in my 19.5, and an Apex Tactical trigger kit in my 19.4. Both kits yield just under a 5-pound break, and do not compromise the Glock Safe Action system. I love both trigger kits, and both 19s are rotated as my EDC.

But. Nothing aftermarket takes the place of constant training. Weapons skills atrophy otherwise.

For what it’s worth.
 
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