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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a Glock 17 Gen 5 and will soon be acquiring a Glock 45. I currently use the G17 and will be using the G45 for concealed carry and on the security team at my church. I want to upgrade both firearms to about a 4 pound trigger and also reduce recoil and muzzle flip. I'd like to hear recommendations on the best complete trigger kits and best lighter weight recoil springs and heavy recoil spring guides, and where to get them. I've gone to a number of sights where I can find these items, but they all say they're the best. Time to hear other opinions that will help me make my decision. Thanks.
 
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I work uniformed armed security at churches. I highly recommend you don’t modify the internals.
Under stress that “heavy” trigger might become too light during a shoot/no shoot situation. Plenty of practice using good fundamentals should overcome any of the perceived shortcomings of your Glocks.
Air gun Trigger Gun barrel Gun accessory Revolver

the mods I have made on this gun are just external. A white light and laser, night sights, magwell and brass mag bottom.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You may want to rethink a lighter trigger for a carry gun. Recoil management is 98% done with a proper grip. There is no benefit to changing the RSA if you are shooting factory ammo. A heavy guide rod (tungsten) is a waste of money. Your money is better spent on an instructor.
I have to respectfully disagree with you, Silver Bolt. I've been shooting since 1990, and I've mastered the grip. The reason to lighten the trigger and reduce recoil and muzzle flip is to get back on target faster. Competitive shooters regularly use lighter triggers and recoil springs for the reasons I stated above. They fire thousands of rounds a month. Training will take care of the rest, like trigger and muzzle discipline, etc.
 
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The reason most major trainer say watch the light trigger and recoil spring is because psychologically you’re in the opposite mentality of a competition shooter. A competition shooter is only focusing on one thing. In a defensive shoot you have multiple considerations. I wouldn’t want to add to it by having a light trigger.
If you lighten your recoil spring you have to taylor your ammo accordingly.
I don’t know your area but if you have liberal DA and he sees you have a race gun in a contestable shoot you will have a mark against you.
People are saying this for your benefit not to criticize you.
 

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I have to respectfully disagree with you, Silver Bolt. I've been shooting since 1990, and I've mastered the grip. The reason to lighten the trigger and reduce recoil and muzzle flip is to get back on target faster. Competitive shooters regularly use lighter triggers and recoil springs for the reasons I stated above. They fire thousands of rounds a month. Training will take care of the rest, like trigger and muzzle discipline, etc.
As a competitive shooter that does shoot thousands of rounds a month, competition and self defense are completely different including the firearms. My G34 competition guns have a light weight trigger. Light triggers belong in competition and the practice range. Recoil management is literally in the hands of the shooter. It doesn't matter that you have been shooting since 1990 if you have not been using proper fundamentals. It's similar to someone that has golfed since they were a kid but still struggles with their score. I am a USPSA Master in Open & Limited. I have trained and competed with some of the best in the world (Max Michel, Jerry Miculek, Taran Butler, KC Eusebio), I am also an Army combat Vet and military trainer. Get yourself some proper training. Modified equipment won't make you a better shooter. As much training and experience I have, my carry guns are factory stock with the exception of sights.

Shooting a lot does not make you a good shooter. SD situations require very specialized training and practice. The mindset you have for the position you are in is dangerous. My $.02.
 

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I have to respectfully disagree with you, Silver Bolt. I've been shooting since 1990, and I've mastered the grip. The reason to lighten the trigger and reduce recoil and muzzle flip is to get back on target faster. Competitive shooters regularly use lighter triggers and recoil springs for the reasons I stated above. They fire thousands of rounds a month. Training will take care of the rest, like trigger and muzzle discipline, etc.
I disagree with you on many levels. I am a retired LEO who works Executive Protection and other armed jobs. I have been carrying for 40+ years.

When you are in an shooting you have super human strength. One reason NYPD went to heavier triggers. Competition and shooting bad guys in public are two very different things.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I disagree with you on many levels. I am a retired LEO who works Executive Protection and other armed jobs. I have been carrying for 40+ years.

When you are in an shooting you have super human strength. One reason NYPD went to heavier triggers. Competition and shooting bad guys in public are two very different things.
I didn't mean to imply that competitive shooting and shooting in a self-defense situation are the same thing. What I was saying is that lighter recoil and muzzle flip and a lighter and crisper trigger pull enables you to get back on target faster. I just used competitive shooters to support my point. Of course, shooting in competition and engaging another human being in a deadly force situation are very different. The nationwide standard for trigger weight on law enforcement firearms is anywhere between 4 pounds and 5.5 pounds. for semi-auto striker fired pistols. I looked that up.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The reason most major trainer say watch the light trigger and recoil spring is because psychologically you’re in the opposite mentality of a competition shooter. A competition shooter is only focusing on one thing. In a defensive shoot you have multiple considerations. I wouldn’t want to add to it by having a light trigger.
If you lighten your recoil spring you have to taylor your ammo accordingly.
I don’t know your area but if you have liberal DA and he sees you have a race gun in a contestable shoot you will have a mark against you.
People are saying this for your benefit not to criticize you.
Thank you. I am not taking these comments as a criticism. My original request, however, was simply for opinions on the best aftermarket trigger kits. I have no intention of modifying my firearms which I use for concealed carry, in any way that that deviates from law enforcement firearms modifications. So far, however, only one post has been placed addressing the original request.
 
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Thank you. I am not taking these comments as a criticism. My original request, however, was simply for opinions on the best aftermarket trigger kits. I have no intention of modifying my firearms which I use for concealed carry, in any way that that deviates from law enforcement firearms modifications. So far, however, only one post has been placed addressing the original request.
I've yet to see a law enforcement agency allow trigger mods and for good reason. The reason you found that when you looked it up is because that's what firearms companies advertise the trigger weight being and then so called experts write a article about it.

The fact is in an actual shoot out none of the things you mentioned will be things you notice in a fire fight. Glocks are a military/duty use firearm and ment to be reliable from the factory. You start changing parts and reliability changes. That's fine for the range,but not for combat or duty.

Do I have mods....sure do! Do I occasionally carry those guns yep...work in a gun store gotta show off..lol. Would I carry those guns when I worked overseas or as an LEO... nope!

For a trigger I like...... overwatch precision
For guide rod and springs....Taran Tactical
For different weight guide rod springs....Wolff

If you do decide to change the things you mentioned make sure you keep all safeties intact. Also for standard pressure ammo no lower than 14lb recoil spring and go back to stock at min for +P or +P+ ammo.
 

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The nationwide standard for trigger weight on law enforcement firearms is anywhere between 4 pounds and 5.5 pounds. for semi-auto striker fired pistols. I looked that up.
The Police Department I retired from approves the Glock pistol for on and off duty carry which is 5.5 pounds with no modifications to the trigger. Their is a reason for this requirement.
 

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Thank you. I am not taking these comments as a criticism. My original request, however, was simply for opinions on the best aftermarket trigger kits. I have no intention of modifying my firearms which I use for concealed carry, in any way that that deviates from law enforcement firearms modifications. So far, however, only one post has been placed addressing the original request.
I am a big fan of the 1000 round Glock Trigger Job. After 1000 rounds down range your OEM Glock trigger will be slicker than snot on a wet sidewalk. YMMV
 

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Trigger to Light?

From the article:
One major benefit of the striker-fired system is the relatively light trigger pull compared to other handgun operating systems. All full-sized and compact Glocks have a trigger pull measuring approximately twenty-four newtons, or 5.39 pounds, versus twenty-eight newtons of force, or 6.29 pounds of force for smaller, concealed carry Glock handguns. This level of force is not uncommon, however, as out of the box, a 1911A1-type pistol has a trigger pull between 4.5 and 6.1 pounds.

Other handguns, particularly double-action handguns, have much heavier trigger pulls. The Beretta 92, for decades the official handgun of the U.S. military, has an initial trigger pull of thirteen pounds as the trigger goes through the various steps to cause the hammer to fall, then a lighter five-pound pull for subsequent shots.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I've yet to see a law enforcement agency allow trigger mods and for good reason. The reason you found that when you looked it up is because that's what firearms companies advertise the trigger weight being and then so called experts write a article about it.

The fact is in an actual shoot out none of the things you mentioned will be things you notice in a fire fight. Glocks are a military/duty use firearm and ment to be reliable from the factory. You start changing parts and reliability changes. That's fine for the range,but not for combat or duty.

Do I have mods....sure do! Do I occasionally carry those guns yep...work in a gun store gotta show off..lol. Would I carry those guns when I worked overseas or as an LEO... nope!

For a trigger I like...... overwatch precision
For guide rod and springs....Taran Tactical
For different weight guide rod springs....Wolff

If you do decide to change the things you mentioned make sure you keep all safeties intact. Also for standard pressure ammo no lower than 14lb recoil spring and go back to stock at min for +P or +P+ ammo.
Thank you for your comment, Wolff. I would never mess with safeties. I'm guessing some of the folks who have been posting responses to my original request for opinions of best triggers, are automatically thinking doing so just gives prosecutors ammunition to use in court. That's true to a degree. My intent, however, is to fine tune my carry firearm to make it safer, not deadlier. I would like to increase the accuracy of the firearm, minimizing chances of stray bullets, etc. All the folks who responded to my original post, have caused me to want to do further research. After my research, I feel more confident in my choice of modifying the carry guns. Prosecutors will spin what we do, to their benefit, no matter what we do. I learned that in my own career as a criminal defense investigator for so many years. By the way, when I looked up what attorneys say about modified triggers, I even learned that attorney Emily Taylor, a criminal defense attorney from Texas, and a specialist in gun owner self defense cases - known for her youtube videos under the name of ARMED ATTORNEYS with Richard Hayes - carries a gun with a modified trigger. Her only caveat is that the modifications should be done by professional gunsmiths, not by the gun owner.
 

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Thank you for your comment, Wolff. I would never mess with safeties. I'm guessing some of the folks who have been posting responses to my original request for opinions of best triggers, are automatically thinking doing so just gives prosecutors ammunition to use in court. That's true to a degree. My intent, however, is to fine tune my carry firearm to make it safer, not deadlier. I would like to increase the accuracy of the firearm, minimizing chances of stray bullets, etc. All the folks who responded to my original post, have caused me to want to do further research. After my research, I feel more confident in my choice of modifying the carry guns. Prosecutors will spin what we do, to their benefit, no matter what we do. I learned that in my own career as a criminal defense investigator for so many years. By the way, when I looked up what attorneys say about modified triggers, I even learned that attorney Emily Taylor, a criminal defense attorney from Texas, and a specialist in gun owner self defense cases - known for her youtube videos under the name of ARMED ATTORNEYS with Richard Hayes - carries a gun with a modified trigger. Her only caveat is that the modifications should be done by professional gunsmiths, not by the gun owner.
The accuracy of the gun far exceeds the accuracy of the operator. You are completely missing all of the points people are making. It has nothing to do with being prosecuted for a modified firearm. It has everything to do with how the human body reacts under extreme stress. You are far more likely to have an ND with a lighter trigger while in a stressful situation. Until you have been in an actual firefight or SD situation you likely just won't understand. I hope that you are never in a situation where you need to draw your weapon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The accuracy of the gun far exceeds the accuracy of the operator. You are completely missing all of the points people are making. It has nothing to do with being prosecuted for a modified firearm. It has everything to do with how the human body reacts under extreme stress. You are far more likely to have an ND with a lighter trigger while in a stressful situation. Until you have been in an actual firefight or SD situation you likely just won't understand. I hope that you are never in a situation where you need to draw your weapon.
I do get your point. My whole reason for wanting to make these modifications was because I did not feel a 5.5 pound trigger and a 17 pound recoil spring and a plastic recoil spring guide rod are an ideal setup on a concealed carry gun under extreme stress conditions. a lighter recoil spring and sturdier recoil spring guide, (in addition to proper grip) would reduce muzzle flip and recoil. That will enable target reacquisition faster under extreme stress. and a 4 pound trigger pull is not too light for a concealed carry gun. I researched it prior to making my choice. 4 pounds is at the bottom end of the threshold. As for your last comment, thank you, but your hope is unnecessary. I'm not some gun nut, itching to get into a firefight. I pray regularly that none of us on the security team will ever find it necessary to draw our firearms or use them, but I train and prepare, just in case. These modifications are part of the preparation.
 

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My whole reason for wanting to make these modifications was because I did not feel a 5.5 pound trigger and a 17 pound recoil spring and a plastic recoil spring guide rod are an ideal setup on a concealed carry gun under extreme stress conditions.
Actually, it is the ideal setup for extreme stress situations. That’s why it’s the exact setup in combat & law enforcement the world over.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
Actually, it is the ideal setup for extreme stress situations. That’s why it’s the exact setup in combat & law enforcement the world over.
Then why do so many people modify their triggers on concealed carry weapons? I just don't think it's ideal for me. For one thing, I'm not a fan of plastic recoil spring rods. They can break. A 15 pound recoil spring lightens recoil and muzzle flip, as opposed to the stock 17 pound spring. A 4 pound trigger is still considered acceptable for a self-defense firearm, as opposed to the stock 5.5 pound trigger.
 
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Then why do so many people modify their triggers on concealed carry weapons? I just don't think it's ideal for me.
I don’t know any le or military that modify internals on edc. I never would. I’ve been shooting for a minute or two. With that said, I’m a huge proponent of individual liberty. It’s your gun do what makes you happy.
 
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