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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Totally nailed the intruder, but I almost blew her elbow off.

Noob question - I am a new shooter/gun owner and I am using my gun for home/self defense. I have heard that I should practice my accuracy at 15-20 feet. Does anyone agree? Disagree?

Thanks!
 

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Not bad.
You've asked kind of a "loaded question."

First things first, as a new shooter, GET TRAINING. In particular if you are going to be using the firearm to defend yourself and others. Learn good fundamentals, then learn good defensive techniques and drills that incorporate stress.

As far as distances go, it's not as important as consistency. Start with a distance where you can consitently hit the same (relatively) the same spot. Then continued to move outward.

If you're doing "slow fire" practice and your paper looks like a shotgun hit it, then you have some more fundamentals to work on at that particular distance.

5-21 feet would be a good place to start.

HTH
D
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Not bad.
You've asked kind of a "loaded question."

First things first, as a new shooter, GET TRAINING. In particular if you are going to be using the firearm to defend yourself and others. Learn good fundamentals, then learn good defensive techniques and drills that incorporate stress.

As far as distances go, it's not as important as consistency. Start with a distance where you can consitently hit the same (relatively) the same spot. Then continued to move outward.

If you're doing "slow fire" practice and your paper looks like a shotgun hit it, then you have some more fundamentals to work on at that particular distance.

5-21 feet would be a good place to start.

HTH
D
Thanks a lot! There are some really good pointers in your reply that I appreciate.

If I can make it to the range this weekend, I'll try your suggestion about starting closer and hitting the same spot then working outward. I'll post the pic to this thread and tag you.

I will also look up some drills that incorporate stress. Thanks again!
 

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Have Gun, Will Carry
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You missed a very important point posted by dwcfastrice: Get (pay for) training. First in basic fundamentals of shooting, and then tactical training. Buy a cheap shot timer and start putting yourself under a little stress. Join IDPA (International Defense Pistol Association) and start participating in the matches. Read and view everything you can from Mas Ayoob -- check him out on YouTube. Learn and apply Jeff Cooper's 4 rules for gun safety, and his 4 awareness conditions (colors).
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You missed a very important point posted by dwcfastrice: Get (pay for) training. First in basic fundamentals of shooting, and then tactical training. Buy a cheap shot timer and start putting yourself under a little stress. Join IDPA (International Defense Pistol Association) and start participating in the matches. Read and view everything you can from Mas Ayoob -- check him out on YouTube. Learn and apply Jeff Cooper's 4 rules for gun safety, and his 4 awareness conditions (colors).
I appreciate any and all advice. I will look into the areas you suggested.

Noob question - what is a shot timer?

I have viewed several videos on YouTube from Ayoob - he knows his stuff!

I will look at Jeff Cooper's videos tonight - thanks again!
 

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Have Gun, Will Carry
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I appreciate any and all advice. I will look into the areas you suggested.

Noob question - what is a shot timer?
An electronic device that times how fast you got your first shot off, the times between shots, and the total time. When you activate it, it will beep, that's when you draw and fire. So, it tells you your reaction time -- how long it took you to get off your first shot and each shot after that.

See: [ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1H_icaRscHY[/ame]
 

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Have Gun, Will Carry
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Agree with dwcfastrice. Also, assuming your POA is consistent on those targets... you are flinching
Yup, flinching can cause a multitude of problems. Normally, when shots are strung up and down one is either pushing down in an attempt to resist recoil, or letting the wrist break up just before the shot leaves the barrel -- not necessarily limp-wristing. Locking the non-dominant hand's wrist slightly downwards helps prevents this.
Here's a Shooting chart:
 

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Have Gun, Will Carry
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Here's probably the best video I have found so far on gripping a pistol by Shannon Smith- Grand Master and World Champion Shooter:

[ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJrA7wMXuuQ[/ame]
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
An electronic device that times how fast you got your first shot off, the times between shots, and the total time. When you activate it, it will beep, that's when you draw and fire. So, it tells you your reaction time -- how long it took you to get off your first shot and each shot after that.

See: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1H_icaRscHY
Thanks! That is a great video and I will definitely purchase a timer!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yup, flinching can cause a multitude of problems. Normally, when shots are strung up and down one is either pushing down in an attempt to resist recoil, or letting the wrist break up just before the shot leaves the barrel -- not necessarily limp-wristing. Locking the non-dominant hand's wrist slightly downwards helps prevents this.
Here's a Shooting chart:
I can definitely tell that I'm flinching. Being a new shooter, I can feel myself, at times, bracing for the recoil.

I saw a video on YouTube with a drill to help correct this. I appreciate the visual and will keep you posted.

Thanks again!
 

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Have Gun, Will Carry
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I can definitely tell that I'm flinching. Being a new shooter, I can feel myself, at times, bracing for the recoil.

I saw a video on YouTube with a drill to help correct this. I appreciate the visual and will keep you posted.

Thanks again!
Have fun shooting, but when you go to the range, have one or two items you are going to work on that session and do nothing else. Practice doesn't make perfect -- perfect practice makes perfect!

A few things I use to help new shooters with flinch:

1. Have someone load a magazine for you mixing in a couple dummy rounds so you can't see where they are. When the dummy round comes up and nothing goes bang and no recoil, you'll instantly know whether or not you have flinched.

2. Exhale and hold, get a good sight picture, then think about NOTHING else except getting the trigger straight back.

3. Follow through is important. After the round goes off and recoil is over, your hold should be on the same shot picture you had prior to the shot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Have fun shooting, but when you go to the range, have one or two items you are going to work on that session and do nothing else. Practice doesn't make perfect -- perfect practice makes perfect!

A few things I use to help new shooters with flinch:

1. Have someone load a magazine for you mixing in a couple dummy rounds so you can't see where they are. When the dummy round comes up and nothing goes bang and no recoil, you'll instantly know whether or not you have flinched.

2. Exhale and hold, get a good sight picture, then think about NOTHING else except getting the trigger straight back.

3. Follow through is important. After the round goes off and recoil is over, your hold should be on the same shot picture you had prior to the shot.
Great advice! Thank you so much, I really do appreciate the extra effort you are putting into this thread.

I am going to the range tomorrow and I will address the flinching issue. If I'm ONLY focusing on this issue, do you recommend that I only place the target 15 feet away? 20 feet away? Farther?
 

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Have Gun, Will Carry
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Great advice! Thank you so much, I really do appreciate the extra effort you are putting into this thread.

I am going to the range tomorrow and I will address the flinching issue. If I'm ONLY focusing on this issue, do you recommend that I only place the target 15 feet away? 20 feet away? Farther?
Well, based on the info in this thread so far, I'd recommend starting at 5 yrds and simply concentrate on getting the correct grip and sight picture with the weapon. Its not important yet that all the rounds go in the same hole, you are concentrating on the correct grip and follow-through for now. Shoot at least 50 rounds and tell yourself that each shot you take must be the one that you will defend your life with. Remember, perfect practice makes perfect.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
3rd Trip - 15 feet

Well, based on the info in this thread so far, I'd recommend starting at 5 yrds and simply concentrate on getting the correct grip and sight picture with the weapon. Its not important yet that all the rounds go in the same hole, you are concentrating on the correct grip and follow-through for now. Shoot at least 50 rounds and tell yourself that each shot you take must be the one that you will defend your life with. Remember, perfect practice makes perfect.
Alright so I just got back from the range again. I know that I've got some strays but I finally started putting all the pieces together with my grip, breathing, nerves (lol) towards the end. This is from 15 feet away. My pattern was 1,2, 3, 5, 6.

5 really gave me a hard time.. I don't think I'll use this target again but it was a learning experience. Let me know if you have any comments.
 

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Alright so I just got back from the range again. I know that I've got some strays but I finally started putting all the pieces together with my grip, breathing, nerves (lol) towards the end. This is from 15 feet away. My pattern was 1,2, 3, 5, 6.

5 really gave me a hard time.. I don't think I'll use this target again but it was a learning experience. Let me know if you have any comments.
6 is good. Looks like you took your time on 1 and 6. Rushed your shots on the others. Not looking for speed yet. Next session, take your time between shots. Concentrate on proper grip, good sight picture (focus is on front sight, target and rear sight will be a little out of focus), trigger straight back, and follow-through. Don't move on to longer ranges until you can put 5 rounds, at 5 yrds, into 1" circle. Load 5 round magazines and rest in between. Perfect grip, sight picture, trigger squeeze, and follow-through. Perfect practice makes perfect!
 

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Targets are looking decent for a first timer!

I am not an instructor, but you may wish to concentrate on hitting one target with consistency before immediately jumping into transitioning from one target to another. Get consistent with your aim and trigger pull before introducing things like multiple targets and timers.

Agree with previous posts: get professional training now - even if it's just a few lessons. As a beginner, an instructor will help establish correct safety and shooting habits/techniques before bad habits establish themselves.

One lesson from a good instructor now will be more productive than waiting two years before taking a dozen lessons from an outstanding instructor who has to spend a large portion of time helping you break poor shooting habits and techniques. You will save money in the long run by spending it on an instructor now - 50 rounds of well thought out practice drills are worth more than 500 rounds of point and shoot practice without a specific goal in mind.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
6 is good. Looks like you took your time on 1 and 6. Rushed your shots on the others. Not looking for speed yet. Next session, take your time between shots. Concentrate on proper grip, good sight picture (focus is on front sight, target and rear sight will be a little out of focus), trigger straight back, and follow-through. Don't move on to longer ranges until you can put 5 rounds, at 5 yrds, into 1" circle. Load 5 round magazines and rest in between. Perfect grip, sight picture, trigger squeeze, and follow-through. Perfect practice makes perfect!
I agree with you on rushing some of my shots. I will take your advice on slowing down, 5 rounds 5 yards into a 1" circle. The phrase for this week is "slow down"

Targets are looking decent for a first timer!

I am not an instructor, but you may wish to concentrate on hitting one target with consistency before immediately jumping into transitioning from one target to another. Get consistent with your aim and trigger pull before introducing things like multiple targets and timers.

Agree with previous posts: get professional training now - even if it's just a few lessons. As a beginner, an instructor will help establish correct safety and shooting habits/techniques before bad habits establish themselves.

One lesson from a good instructor now will be more productive than waiting two years before taking a dozen lessons from an outstanding instructor who has to spend a large portion of time helping you break poor shooting habits and techniques. You will save money in the long run by spending it on an instructor now - 50 rounds of well thought out practice drills are worth more than 500 rounds of point and shoot practice without a specific goal in mind.
Great advice! Thank you for taking the time to write this. I am looking into the proper place to get training.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
6 is good. Looks like you took your time on 1 and 6. Rushed your shots on the others. Not looking for speed yet. Next session, take your time between shots. Concentrate on proper grip, good sight picture (focus is on front sight, target and rear sight will be a little out of focus), trigger straight back, and follow-through. Don't move on to longer ranges until you can put 5 rounds, at 5 yrds, into 1" circle. Load 5 round magazines and rest in between. Perfect grip, sight picture, trigger squeeze, and follow-through. Perfect practice makes perfect!
I started training myself today on not slapping the trigger and it is paying off with my accuracy. I know this is far from perfect, but I am not flinching due to the decreased pull resistance.
 

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