The 1926 Glock: Two great tastes that tastes horrible together

  1. Editor
    MattV2099, perhaps best known for his Glocks and food torture tests, experimented with what would happen if you swap the slides on a Glock 19 and 26-- so you don't have to-- all in the name of science.

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    But before we roll that beautiful bean footage, let's take a look at the guns for those who may not already be aware.

    Backgrounder, G19

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    Just a tad bit smaller than its G17 big brother, the Glock 19 is a more compact design. Shaving off about a half inch and a few ounces, the gun is overall more concealable while still having a 15+1 capacity and the ability to accept G17 mags to boost that if wanted.

    This makes the G19 the choice for those who want the benefits of a full-sized gun with more concealability and carry ease. This is why the defacto gun of the NYPD, the largest police force in the US, is the G19 (although with a horrible NY1/NY2 trigger.) These guns have a huge fan club that includes NRA commentator Mr. Colin Noir and instructors Dave Spaulding, Larry Vickers, and Kelly McCann. Moving in calibers up, the .40 cal version of the G19 is the G23 while the .45ACP is the G30.

    Backgrounder, G26

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    Going even smaller than the G19 is the subcompact Glock 26. This gun, first of the 1990s AWB-era "Baby Glocks" is about as groovy as it gets in tiny 9mm pistols that still have a decent magazine capacity. Weighing in at 26-ounces loaded and with a 6.41-inch overall length, the G26 still has a 10+1 capacity and can accept both mags for the G19 and G17 although of course they will hang out past the grip considerably.

    A bonus about this gun is that with its standard 10-shot capacity mags, its legal in many states (New York, California, etc.) that have ludicrous magazine capacity limits without having to get special compliant mags. Moving in calibers up, the .40 cal version of the 26 is the - while the .45ACP is the single stack G36.

    So what about mixing the two together?

    First off, it's really hard to figure out why you would want to do this. Sure, it would be neat to marry up the shorter (about a half inch) G26 slide/barrel onto the G19 frame to give a 16-shot 9mm with a full size grip-- but as Matt shows below (spoiler alert), it doesn't work that way as the slide won't match up to chamber a round.

    Likewise, if you take the G19 top half and install it on the G26 frame, it will chamber and fire, but the dust guard is open to the elements and the now long-slide subcompact does some really oddball things.

    Like smack you with brass to the face.

    Without further, check out Matt's video.



    And his disclaimer: I have created the illusion of danger and recklessness to induce an emotional response in uninformed or ignorant viewers that I have to deal with every day. Thank you for watching. Don't try this at home. I follow the 4 rules of firearm safety.

    And our disclaimer: Don't try this at home, kids.

    So, if you were ever curious if the G26 and G19 had swappable slides-- at least now you have your answer.

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